Power Supply - Kit

Overview

A Power Supply DIY Kit that can be used to power the Q-Client Builder Base or any of your other projects from a 9V battery. 5V and 3.3V as available as output voltages.

beginner

$15

 


Required hardware

Components

The full DIY Kit can be purchased here

The components are part of the DIY Kit or can be sourced separately with help of the BOM:

Picture

Name

Designator

Quantity

Picture

Name

Designator

Quantity

 

Radial LED (5mm)

D3

1

 

Sliding Switch

S1, S2

2

240Ω Resistor

R1

1

330Ω Resistor

R3

1

390Ω Resistor

R2

1

4.7kΩ Resistor

R4

1

Reads: “0.22µF”

220nf Polarized Capacitor

C1

1

Reads: “1µF”

1uf Polarized Capacitor

C2

1

 

1N4000 Diode

D1, D2

2

 

LM317MB

U1

1

 

Heatsink

M1

1

 

Heatsink Pad

 

1

 

1x2 3.5mm Terminal Block

J3

1

 

1x2 pin header

J2, J4, J5

3

 

2.1mm Barrel Jack

J1

1

 

2.1mm Barrel Jack to 9V adapter

 

1

 

PTC Fuse

F1

1

 

Mounting Hardware

  • 3x M3 Screws

  • 1x M3 Nuts

 

4

Power Supply PCB

Q-PCB-001

1

Q-Client Builder Base

 

1

Tools

Picture

Name

Quantity

Link

Picture

Name

Quantity

Link

Small slotted-head screwdriver

1

Included in Component Kit

Or you can pick from one on our Recommended Tools List

 

Soldering Iron

1

You can pick from one on our Recommended Tools List

 

Solder

1

You can pick from one on our Recommended Tools List

 

Diagonal Cutters

1

You can pick from one on our Recommended Tools List

 

Work Holder

 

You can pick from one on our Recommended Tools List


Story

The Idea

The Power Supply kit is a handy device that can be used in a multitude of projects. You can use it to wirelessly power your builder base and all connected components. The power supply accepts 7-12V batteries via a 2.1mm barrel jack and regulates the voltage down to 5V or 3.3V. The power supply can connect to the Builder Base via the 3.3V or 5V ports.

Video

 

Build Process

Step 1: PCB Assembly and Soldering

Take a look at the required components above and determine their final position on the PCB. The following images should be a good reference:

 

Place groups of components on the board and then solder them to the pads. It is recommended to start with components with the lowest profile, like for example resistor and then move up to components like buttons with higher profile.

To determine the values of the given resistors and to place them in the correct position, please refer to a resistor color code calculator like this one:

https://www.digikey.com/en/resources/conversion-calculators/conversion-calculator-resistor-color-code

Using some form of work holder is advised. You can find a list of suitable work holders on our Recommended Tools List.

Don’t forget to place the heatsink pad between the heatsink (M1) and the voltage regulator (U1). Screw them together with an M3 screw and an M3 nut that come in the DIY Kit.

Two additional M3 screws are included to mount the DIY Kit to any project board.

Step 2: Connecting to the Builder Base

You have two options for connecting the power supply to your Builder Base: you can use the male headers on the bottom of your PCB to stick it on the GND and VCC rails of a bread board, or you can use the screw terminals located on the top of your power supply. Both options serve the same purpose, but one might work better for a given project than the other. Don’t forget to set the switch to your desired voltage.


Projects

Any project compatible

The Power Supply DIY Kit can be used in a variety of projects! It can power your Builder Base or your entire Breadboard circuit!


Gallery

 

 

 

 


Resources

Current revision

Assembly files for the current revision of the DIY Kit (Rev G):

https://github.com/QuantumIntegration/Q-PCB-001-Power-Supply-Hardware-Files/tree/Rev_G

Older revisions

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